Explore our Resource Library
Donate now
Like us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Pin us on Pinterest!

CALENDAR

Oct 25 Cute Critters in Costumes!
(Western Pet Supply)
Nov 15 Outreach
(Western Pet Supply)
Dec 20 Outreach
(Western Pet Supply)

CLICK HERE to read the latest Newsletter
Fall 2014

GoodSearch logo


Web This Site

Resource Index

Click on the links below to jump to the topic you wish to read.


Hard Choices – Finding a New Home for Your Companion Animal

  • CLICK HERE to download a document which examines the issues and options you should consider as you work through the decision to find another home for your animal companion.

Finding Pet-Friendly Housing

For pet owners, the inability to find pet friendly housing is one of the leading causes of animal abandonment. One useful resource is https://www.apartmentlist.com/. After entering the Zip Code for your area you can modify your search for just pet friendly housing by checking the “Pet Policy” option from the “Advanced” tab at the top of the page..

Pet Boarding Facilities We Can Recommend

Return to top


County Animal Control / Shelters

Return to top


Local Humane Societies

Return to top


Other Rescue/Shelter Resources

Return to top


Medical Issues

Emergency Medical Care and Transportation

Routine Medical Care

  • Choosing a Vet by Kind Planet
  • Care Credit Loans
    Care Credit is a low-interest credit card for medical or veterinary use only, and is accepted at a variety of local clinics. Clients must be approved, and the card may only be used at participating veterinary clinics. Call 800-677-0718 or visit their Web site for more information.

Insurance Options

  • 2014 Pet Insurance Reviews
    The Reviews.com research team compiled a list of 22 pet insurance companies and then selected 12 of the best to review based on 52 pet insurance features. Note: Animal Aid does not endorse any specific insurance plan.

Return to top


Population Control (Spay/Neuter Options)

Why This Is So Important!

Be Part of the Solution – Local Options

  • "Spay and Save!" The Animal Shelter Alliance of Portland (ASAP) offers $10 spay/neuters year-round for cats and kittens of low-income families* in the Portland Metro area (Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas or Clark County). Multiple cats/kittens and stray/feral cats welcome!
  • Oregon Spay/Neuter Fund Program coupons and instructions.
    The Oregon Spay Neuter Fund coupon is accepted at several area clinics in and around Portland, as well as in the Willamette Valley – check the list on the coupon. There are no income restrictions required to use the coupon, and there are no additional charges for spaying animals that are pregnant or in heat. Several clinics that accept the coupon are able to spay and neuter
    feral cats. Contact the clinics for details or to schedule an appointment.
  • The Oregon Humane Society Spay/Neuter Assistance Plan (SNAP) provides direct assistance to those who need financial help to pay for their cat's spay or neuter surgery. Seniors with inadequate income, the unemployed and under-employed, and people on public assistance receive help through this program. The SNAP certificate covers the full cost of the cat's surgery at participating veterinary clinics. Some vets will accept both the SNAP coupon and the OSNF coupon (above).To apply for SNAP, call the Oregon Humane Society at 503-285-7722 ext. 224.
  • Pet Over-Population Prevention Advocates (POPPA) Inc., of Beaverton OR runs a statewide spay/neuter referral and assistance service for dogs, cats, rabbits and ferrets. For questions call 503-626-4070. We receive grants from POPPA with which we can help subsidize a portion of the cost of spaying or neutering socialized cats for low income individuals. POPPA spays and neuters are not free,
    but the amount you must pay is based on your need and our available funding. Our available funding varies with the volume of calls we receive, so even if you have been approved for a certain amount of assistance in the past, you may not be eligible to receive the same amount of assistance in the future.
  • The Feral Cat Coalition of Oregon is a trap-neuter-return (TNR) program for feral and stray cats living in Oregon. The goal of the program is to reduce suffering for existing feral cats and prevent the births and suffering of future generations. The program's services are targeted for feral cats who have caregivers feeding them. The caregivers trap the cats, bring them to a clinic, and return the cats to where they are being fed with a commitment to feed the cat(s) on a permanent basis.
  • Care Credit Loans
    Care Credit is a low-interest credit card for medical or veterinary use only, and is accepted at a variety of local clinics. Clients must be approved, and the card may only be used at participating veterinary clinics. Call 800-677-0718 or visit their Web site for more information.
  • Oregon Humane Society Loans
    The Oregon Humane Society can provide interest-free loans for up to $50 towards the cost of spaying or neutering. All loans must be repaid in full within 3 months. Call 503-285-7722 or visit the Web site for details.
  • Neuter/Spay Assistance and Information ~ Oregon, Washington, Nationwide

Return to top


Disaster Planning

Monique Balas, Pet Columnist for The Oregonian

Recent years' somber events remind us that it's time to update the contents of our own 72-hour emergency preparedness kits. Remember, as you watch the TV coverage of Japan, that the Pacific NW is its seismic twin...

What! You don't HAVE an emergency preparedness kit?

  • CLICK HERE for a checklist that will help you get started on what you will need to provide for your companion animals.
  • CLICK HERE to visit the Disaster Preparedness page on the Oregon Veterinary Medical Association Web site, which includes information on planning for larger animals.
  • CLICK HERE for a checklist for you and the two-legged members of your family.
CLICK HERE to see a sample of what should appear on your Pet ID sheet Click to see a sample of the photo ID sheet you can create for your pet
  • Click on one of these images to take a look at a sample Pet Photo ID Sheet (which disaster preparedness agencies recommend you have) and CLICK HERE to download a Microsoft Word 2003 document that will get you started on creating one for yourself.

 

Not all disasters are large-scale – personal disasters are just as devastating!

  • CLICK HERE for an In Case of Car Accident form to have filled out and findable in your car.
  • CLICK HERE for a sample of a Durable Power of Attorney for Pet Custody and Care in the State of Oregon, which will allow a person of your choice to act in your behalf if you are incapacitated.

Return to top


Low-cost Microchip Identification Options

Return to top


Lost and Found Questions 

Organizations with Online Posting Capabilities:

Excellent Reference Material:

Return to top


General Resources

Return to top


Good Reads for Current or Prospective Pet Owners

    Fido's City Guide - Everything Canine in the City!
  • Fido's City Guide encourages online participation with its multitude of blogs, calendars, events, and contests. Dog owners will find this an excellent reference.


  • The local publication Spot Magazine. Companion and working animals are important, beloved members of the family, and Spot Magazine is the one-stop resource for information, ideas,and events of interest to these animals and their people.
  • The PortlandPooch.com Web site is chock full of information of interest to – you guessed it – Portland dog owners. A good reference for everything from pet-friendly businesses and lodging to events and dog parks.
  • A strong supporter of local rescue organizations, Tails Pet Magazine and Web site has an excellent local branch "celebrating the relationship between pets and their people". The event calendar and articles help animal lovers connect with local opportunities.
  • Dos and Don'ts of Pet-Keeping by PetStation
  • PAWS Resource Library

Return to top


Pets and Children

Return to top...


 

coyotePets and Wildlife

Return to top...


Feline Topics

Onychectomy (partial toe amputation erroneously called "declawing")

Return to top


Canine Topics

Return to top